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Arts & Societies - Letter of Seminar # 97 - Caroline van Eck


A former student at the Ecole du Louvre, Caroline van Eck is a Professor of Art History at Cambridge. In 2017 she holds the Slade Chair in Fine Art at the university of Oxford. Recentely, she published : Art, Agency and Living Presence. From the Animated Image to the Excessive Object (Munich, de Gruyter, 2015) ; François Lemée et la statue de Louis XIV sur la Place des Victoires : les débuts d’une réflexion ethnographique et esthétique sur le fétichisme (Paris, Centre Allemand d’histoire de l’art/Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, 2013) ; « Art Works that Refuse to Behave : Agency, Excess and Material Presence », in Canova and Manet, New Literary History, October 2015 ; and, with Miguel John Versluys et Pieter ter Keurs, « The Lives of Styles. Objects, Agency and Cultural Memory », Cahiers de l’Ecole du Louvre, vol. 7/1, 2015.

Arts & Societies - Letter of Seminar # 97 - Caroline van Eck

Références

Caroline van Eck, "A Neo-Classical Dream and an Archaeologist's Nightmare': Piranesi's Colossal Candelabra in the Aschmolean Museum" in Letter of Seminar, Arts & Societes, #97, December 18, 2017



At the end of his life, Giovanni Battista Piranesi fabricated three large candelabra along with some vases, tripods, and stands out of some mud-covered debris left over from sculptures that had been rediscovered in Hadrian’s villa during the Pantanello excavations of 1769. In retracing the history of these candelabra that no longer evince any of the sobriety of Antiquity or express their original meaning, Caroline Van Eck introduces us to the complicated trajectory of these art objects, starting with the moment of their production and going all the way to their reception. She tests the effectiveness of some anthropological methods of analysis by identifying what pertains to the commodification of art objects and to their singularization.

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac

Auteur(s)

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac

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