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Arts & Societies - Letter of Seminar #93 - Marie Tchernia


After completing her Master’s degree at the University of Paris IV-Sorbonne, Marie Tchernia-Blanchard joined the École du Louvre, where she has specialized in the history of the history of art. Following her first two research papers, which bore on the Écrits et engagements politiques d’Henri Focillon (1931-1943) (Writings and political commitments of Henri Focillon [1931-1943]) and Historiens de l’art français en exil aux États-Unis pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale (Historians of French art exiled in the United States during World War II), she prepared, under the joint supervision of Pierre Sesmat and François-René Martin, a dissertation entitled Le Style comme civilisation: Charles Sterling (1901-1991), historien de l’art, which she defended at the University of Lorraine in June 2016. She was a research fellow at the French National Institute of Art History (INHA) between 2009 and 2013, and she received a Daniel and Nina Carasso research grant at the École du Louvre in 2013-2014. Since September 2014, she has been teaching the History and Theory of the Arts for the multidisciplinary postgraduate academic program at the Sciences and Letters Faculty of the University of Paris.

Arts & Societies - Letter of Seminar #93 - Marie Tchernia

Références

Marie Tchernia, "A "Complete History of Painting [Limited] to Still Life Alone": Charles Sterling and the 1952 The Still Life from Antiquity to Today Exhibition" : Charles Sterling et l'exposition La Nature morte de l'Antiquité à nos jours (1952)" in Letter of Seminar, Arts and Societies, #93, May, 17, 2017



Charles Sterling is among those museum curators whose originality is to be rediscovered. Having had to flee Vichy France and the Nazi Occupation during World War II, he never was able to create exactly the kind of exhibition he wanted to organize until the Spring of 1952, when he presented his European retrospective The Still Life from Antiquity to Today at the Orangerie in the Tuileries Gardens. This exhibition served as the manifesto for his way of doing art history. Sterling’s choice of a longue durée presentation allowed him to investigate both art from the past and art up to and including that of contemporary artists who, in 1952, were recording the first signs of modern life. Marie Tchernia, who defended her excellent dissertation on Sterling’s career, looks back for us on this presentation of still lifes. We necessarily see things differently today, but the charting of this corpus is still of the greatest interest to us, since its author took a broad view and obstinately believed in an “international culture.”

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac

Auteur(s)

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac

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